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Surviving grief during the pandemic and after

Lory's Place is here to support you in person or virtually with articles, tips, and activities that will help you on your grief journey.

If you are grieving a death and think a support group might be for you, please contact us at 269.983.2707. We’re always here and available to listen. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for more grief content, and you can always find us at lorysplace.org
 

 

Your grief healing blog

Sep 21, 2022 Reporting from Niles, MI
Sep 21, 2022
What is self-care?

What is self-care?

SpectrumHealth Lakeland

“Do not try to fight a lion if you are not one yourself.”- African Proverb

Perimeter Healthcare defines self-care as a general term that describes everything you do deliberately for your mental, physical, and emotional well-being. Self-care encourages you to maintain a healthy relationship with yourself so that you can transmit the good feelings to others. You cannot give to others what you don't have yourself. While some may misconstrue self-care as selfish, it's far from that. 

Self-care is something one often forgets about when dealing with life. The day-to-day hustle and bustle often gets in the way. Whether you work full-time, part-time, or are even retired, there always seems like that there is always work that needs to get done. When do we sit down? When do we cook a homemade meal? When do we take time to grieve? In our daily lives, we recognize that death does not seem to take a break, yet it is also something that takes away all our energy.

Taking care of your grief is exercising self-care. As grief comes in many ways, so does self-care. Not to mention, if you don’t take care of yourself, how can you care for others?

Here are some examples of good tools to help you with both self-care and grief:

  • Eat a healthy well-balanced meal
  • Exercise
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Go for a walk
  • Get adequate sleep (for adults 6-8hours)
  • Sit in the sunlight
  • Take a bath or shower/good hygiene in general.
  • Be part of a group that supports you

Here are some active ways to care for yourself and your grief:

  • Ask for help and accept it when it is offered
  • Maintain a trusted circle of friends and/or community
  • Plan something to look forward to (keep it simple if appropriate)
  • Create new traditions around the holidays
  • Journal (no professional writing experience necessary)
  • Set boundaries and learn to say no as to not overcommit
  • Re-calibrate your priorities if needed
  • Learn to disconnect (the world will be here when you return)
  • Practice positive self-talk
  • Re-engage or deepen your spiritual practices

It’s ok to take care of you first, and taking time to grieve in a healthy way is important.

If you are grieving a death and think a support group might be for you, please contact us at 269.983.2707. We’re always here and available to listen.

What is self-care?
by User Not Found | Sep 21, 2022    Share


“Do not try to fight a lion if you are not one yourself.”- African Proverb

Perimeter Healthcare defines self-care as a general term that describes everything you do deliberately for your mental, physical, and emotional well-being. Self-care encourages you to maintain a healthy relationship with yourself so that you can transmit the good feelings to others. You cannot give to others what you don't have yourself. While some may misconstrue self-care as selfish, it's far from that. 

Self-care is something one often forgets about when dealing with life. The day-to-day hustle and bustle often gets in the way. Whether you work full-time, part-time, or are even retired, there always seems like that there is always work that needs to get done. When do we sit down? When do we cook a homemade meal? When do we take time to grieve? In our daily lives, we recognize that death does not seem to take a break, yet it is also something that takes away all our energy.

Taking care of your grief is exercising self-care. As grief comes in many ways, so does self-care. Not to mention, if you don’t take care of yourself, how can you care for others?

Here are some examples of good tools to help you with both self-care and grief:

  • Eat a healthy well-balanced meal
  • Exercise
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Go for a walk
  • Get adequate sleep (for adults 6-8hours)
  • Sit in the sunlight
  • Take a bath or shower/good hygiene in general.
  • Be part of a group that supports you

Here are some active ways to care for yourself and your grief:

  • Ask for help and accept it when it is offered
  • Maintain a trusted circle of friends and/or community
  • Plan something to look forward to (keep it simple if appropriate)
  • Create new traditions around the holidays
  • Journal (no professional writing experience necessary)
  • Set boundaries and learn to say no as to not overcommit
  • Re-calibrate your priorities if needed
  • Learn to disconnect (the world will be here when you return)
  • Practice positive self-talk
  • Re-engage or deepen your spiritual practices

It’s ok to take care of you first, and taking time to grieve in a healthy way is important.

If you are grieving a death and think a support group might be for you, please contact us at 269.983.2707. We’re always here and available to listen.

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Home Activities

Here are some creative grief activities for adults, children or families that can be done at home.

Forget Me Not Activity (PDF)

Memory Mask Activity (PDF)

Positive Post-Its Activity (PDF)

Questions from Quarantine Activity (PDF)

Support Chain Activity (PDF)

Wish Keeper Activity (PDF)

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