Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer affects 1 in every 8 men

The earliest signs of prostate cancer are often urinary, including weak stream, frequent urination, burning sensation when urinating, difficulty starting flow, dribbling, and even blood in the urine.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men except for skin cancer and the warning signs of the disease can be confused with other conditions. It is also the second-leading cause of cancer-related death in men, after lung cancer.

The good news is that prostate cancer is also one of the most treatable types of cancer, and the death rates are declining due to early detection and improved treatments.

Don't become a statistic! If you are a male, over 50 years old, and haven't had a prostate screening this year, talk to your primary care provider today.

If you don't currently have a primary care provider, click here to find one that's right for you.

Click the contact us button below, let us know what we can help you with, and one of our team members will reach out and connect with you.

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Some men are at greater risk for prostate cancer. Those who are older are more likely to be diagnosed with the disease. Prostate cancer is rare in men younger than 40 years old but once they reach 50, the risk increases. Black men are more likely than men of other races to be diagnosed with prostate cancer, have the condition at a younger age, and die from the disease.

Genetics may also play a role in why some men develop prostate cancer. Men whose father or brother have the disease are more than twice as likely to also be diagnosed. The risk increases if several family members are affected and if these men were diagnosed at a younger age.

While 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer during his lifetime, only 1 in 41 will die of this disease. Men who are 50 and older should discuss their risk factors for prostate cancer with their doctor and determine if a screening is right for them.

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