COVID-19 Resources and Information

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What to do if you think you may have COVID-19

With a growing number of confirmed COVID-19 (coronavirus) cases in West Michigan and the United States, feeling sick can be scary. If you have symptoms like fever, cough or shortness of breath, contact your primary care provider immediately. If you do not have a provider, call 1.800. LAKELAND or visit spectrumhealthlakeland.org/primarycare to find available providers in your area.
 
You can use the automated screener below or call 833.559.0659 for advice on what to do next. Please note: screening is required before a receiving an order for a COVID-19 diagnostic test. Learn more about screening, obtaining a COVID-19 test order, and collecting your results, here
 

Covid19 Call

 


Here's How We're Responding



We're Ready for You

Don't delay your care. If you have a health need right now, then it deserves our attention right now.




Expanding Virtual Care

You can receive an online evaluation 24/7 by a board-certified physician by phone, computer or app. 




New Visitor Policy

Effective June 15, we've changed our family and visitor policy to ensure the health and safety of our patient and team members. 






COVID-19 Spectrum Health Lakeland Dashboard

updated 10-31-2020 at 9:30 a.m.

For a more detailed breakdown of confirmed and presumed cases, recoveries, and a map of Berrien County cases click here.

COVID19 dashboard 10.31.20


We are all in this together


At Spectrum Health, we’re working to support our community through the pandemic. Our goal is to help you and your family stay healthy and get the care you need.

COVID-19 FAQs


Q. What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Symptoms of COVID-19 are flu-like and may include fever, cough, sore throat or shortness of breath. Some people may also experience fatigue, body aches, a runny nose or a sore throat. Most people develop only mild symptoms. But some people, usually those with other medical complications, may develop more severe symptoms, including pneumonia.

Q: Who is at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19?

People at higher risk include:

  • People 60 and older.
  • People with underlying health conditions such as heart or lung disease.
  • People who have weakened immune systems.
  • People who are pregnant.

People at higher risk of severe illness should stay home and away from large groups of people as much as possible. The CDC website has a comprehensive listing of people at higher risk.

Q. What is the difference between a COVID-19 screening and a COVID-19 test?

The purpose of the COVID-19 screening is to detect risk factors for the virus. Screenings are completed by answering a series of questions. Your risk results are given to you immediately.

A screening is not COVID-19 test. A screening is required before a COVID-19 diagnostic test may occur.

If you have been screened and you have a doctor’s order, you may be eligible to be tested for COVID-19. A COVID-19 test is diagnostic laboratory test that can identify the virus that causes COVID-19. It requires a specimen collection including swabs of your throat, nose and a sample of your saliva. The specimens will be sent to an appropriate testing facility. Results can be delayed several days.

Q. Should I be tested?

Not everyone who feels sick needs to be tested.

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, cough, sore throat and shortness of breath. If you have been exposed to someone with confirmed COVID-19 and are experiencing symptoms, you might have COVID-19. Please contact your doctor or call the Spectrum Health COVID-19 hotline 833.559.0659.

For patients who need testing, we offer drive-through testing by appointment only.

Note: Currently, most testing is being reserved for patients who are severely ill and are at a high risk of infecting others. We know it is frustrating to not know for sure if you have the virus. We appreciate your cooperation and understanding that we're unable to test everyone who may have COVID-19 at this time. If you have a mild case, you may be able to treat your symptoms at home. Staying home helps prevent you from exposing other people to the disease.

Q How long should someone with COVID-19 be in home isolation?

The Michigan State Department of Health and Human Services recommends continuing home isolation until:

At least 3 days (72 hours) have passed with no fever (without the use of fever-reducing drugs) and your symptoms have improved.

AND

At least 7 days have passed since symptoms first appeared.

You may also discontinue home isolation if you had a laboratory-confirmed positive COVID-19 test and at least 7 days have passed from the diagnosis and you've had no symptoms.


 

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